Day: January 6, 2020

Irish SetterIrish Setter

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Irish Red and White Setter courtesy Michael Lamp, Kerry Blue Terrier Club of Southern California

Irish Setter

Quick Facts

  • Weight: 55 – 75 pounds (24.95 – 34.02 kg)
  • Height: 24 – 28 inches (60.96 – 71.12 cm)

The Look of a Irish Setter

Irish Setters have balanced, elegant, medium-sized frames (sometimes larger) covered in silky red coats that grow long on the ears, tails and chests. Their handsome, lean heads have long muzzles, almond shaped eyes, dark noses and long, thin ears. They have elegant necks that slope down to deep chests and level backs. Their long, tapered tails are usually carried horizontally. All four legs are lean but muscular. Their red coats can range anywhere from chestnut to mahogany, with or without white patches. Overall, the Irish Setter is a mixture of refined beauty and rustic vitality.

Photography by Kayla Bertagnolli, as captured at the 2018 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.


Traits

  • Loving
  • Vigorous
  • High-energy
  • Handsome
  • Fast
  • Hardy

Ideal Human Companion

  • Families
  • Active seniors
  • Joggers and hikers

What They Are Like to Live With

An Irish Setter.

Irish Setter. Photography by DragoNika / Shutterstock.

When you bring an Irish Setter into your home, prepare for a downright giddy housemate. Full of boisterous energy and love, Irish Setters will want to be involved in everything you do. They love family time, whether indoors or out, and they get along famously with children.

Irish Setters form strong bonds with their owners, but they are gentle and welcoming with just about everybody—other pets included. Aside from a good, healthy bark, they don’t have any solid “watchdog skills.” Strangers who drop by the house will most likely be wrangled into a lengthy game of fetch.

Bred for hunting in the fields, Irish Setters are bursting with energy, quickness and endurance. If you’re a jogger, runner or bicyclist, take them along. Irish Setters will be calm, happy and trainable as long as they have an outlet for this exuberant energy.

Things You Should Know

Irish Setter.

An Irish Setter catching a flying disc during competition. Photography by Ksenia Raykova / Shutterstock.

Irish Setters have a rambunctious personality that’s almost puppy-like—a trait that can linger long after the puppy years are over. Though always full of good intentions and great vibes, Irish Setters will benefit from firm, positive training.

These dogs love having a big back yard to play in, but they don’t like to be left alone for too long. A happy Irish Setter is one that get healthy doses of exercise and attention.

Irish Setters can live as long as 15 years. Common health issues can include hip dysplasia, skin allergies, eye problems and epilepsy. Also, observe portion control when it comes to feeding: Irish Setters are prone to bloat. Feeding them smaller meals throughout the day is a good practice.

Irish Setter History

Irish Setters were developed from a mix of Irish Terrier, Irish Water Spaniel and English Setter—among other breeds—to be the ideal birding dog. For hundreds of years, they were categorized with a large group of red and white setters. In the early 1800s, the solid-red Irish setter became the commonly accepted type, though some of these red dogs still carried patches of white. With the instincts of a great hunter, the beauty of a show dog and the winning personality of a family pet, the Irish Setter is one of the world’s most beloved dogs.

Read more about the Irish Setter on Dogster.com:

Get to Know the Irish Setter: An Energetic, Clever Companion

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KomondorKomondor

The post Komondor by Dogster HQ appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

unique kinds of dog breeds

Dog facts: the Komondor has the heaviest coat of any breed. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Komondor

Quick Facts

  • Weight: 80 – 135 pounds (36.29 – 61.23 kg)
  • Height: 23 – 32 inches (58.42 – 81.28 cm)

The Look of a Komondor

Komondors were bred to be large, muscular guardians of sheep and later cattle, mostly without human supervision. Their most notable feature, their white, corded coat, was developed to act as a barrier against bear and wolf teeth and claws and to blend in with the sheep they guarded. Their fur also helps protect them against changes in the weather and Komondors are actually comfortable in both low and high temperatures.

Komondors stand at about 25 and a half to 30 inches and their body is slightly longer than their height at the withers. Their eyes are almond shaped and must be brown to be considered for showing. They have wide nostrils and a wide, short muzzle. They are big-boned and rugged – true outdoorsmen.

Thumbnail: Photography by Kayla Bertagnolli, as captured at the 2018 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show


Traits

  • Long, thick, white corded double coat
  • Broad head with short muzzle
  • Grayish skin tone
  • Level “scissors” bite

Ideal Human Companion

  • Firm, alpha leaders
  • Families with older children
  • Hikers and long-walk aficionados
  • Rural or suburban owners with a fenced-in yard

What They Are Like to Live With

Despite their somewhat comical appearance, Komondors are strong protectors. They were bred to be flock guardians and contended with formidable adversaries such as bears and wolves. They are very confident dogs and need a strong leader in order to be a good family dog. Obedience training is a must and socializing them early on is imperative to avoid human or dog aggression when grown.

Komondors are devoted to their families, wary of strangers and are highly intelligent. Owning a Komondor is owning an independent dog, capable of fierceness but also of love.

Things You Should Know

Komondors are relatively healthy dogs with skin allergies, hip dysplasia and bloat as their main health concerns. Komondors with skin allergies or parasites are a bit tougher to treat than other breeds because of their massive coat. Washing with the proper shampoo is recommended, as dipping the dogs can discolor their white fur. Hip dysplasia is common and manageable in many big dogs and the risk of bloat can be lessened by raising the dog’s food and water bowls. Their messy-looking corded coat is actually very neat and should be separated carefully weekly. They do need frequent bathing (expect a long drying time)

Komondors live approximately 10 to 12 years. They mature a little more slowly than smaller dogs but their serious demeanor means less, if any, of the goofy adolescent years. Komondors are actually very lazy dogs due to their need to conserve energy when guarding a flock so they could fight any attackers on a drop.

Komondor History

It is believed that Komondors, descendants from Tibetan dogs, hail from Hungary when the Magyars (nomadic people) came from Asia around 1000 A.D. There’s also a possibility that they come from the Cumans (a Turkish nomadic people) in Cumania where Komondor bones have been found. Indeed, “Komondor” means “dog of the Cumans.”

They were seen first in dog shows in the 1920s and accepted by the AKC in 1937. As of 2011, they rank 154th on the AKC Dog Registry.

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This Hotel Is Helping Shelter Pups Find Their Forever HomesThis Hotel Is Helping Shelter Pups Find Their Forever Homes

The post This Hotel Is Helping Shelter Pups Find Their Forever Homes by Bryn Nowell appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

Imagine arriving to your hotel after a long day of travel. Exhausted, you begin the check-in process when you notice movement behind the registration desk. Curious, you peer over the counter and notice a smiling dog, tail wagging, practically begging for you to say hello.

Members of the hotel staff invite you to spend time with the pup, and you feel the stress of the day melt away after being greeted by kisses and wiggles. “He’s available for adoption,” the staff member says. What started as a humdrum business trip has resulted in you finding a new best friend and family member.

Hotel Helps Dogs Get Adopted

The Aloft Asheville hotel is one of the four participating McKibbon Aloft hotels in the hotel dog program. Photography courtesy of Ryan Watkins.

This hypothetical situation has been the reality for hundreds of travelers as they’ve stayed at four different Aloft Hotel locations. “It all started with a real love for dogs,” states Emma Ledbetter, corporate food and beverage manager for McKibbon Hospitality, and the person who spearheaded its dog foster program following two serendipitous plane rides.

Initially, Emma was hoping to establish a “hotel dog” program and was working with management to develop a plan. The plan changed after sitting next to a representative from Charlie’s Angels Animal Rescue on a flight. They chatted about their dogs and started to brainstorm a way to establish a partnership. Two days later, Emma found herself sitting next to the same person. They picked up where they left off and came up with a plan.

Here’s how it works

The rescue is responsible for vetting potential adopters. Hotel guests submit an adoption application, and the rescue contacts landlords, veterinarians and checks the home. The hotel serves as the temporary home and caretaker for the dog. They maintain a food and walk log, arrange for an observation period to allow the dog to get settled and feel comfortable, and help guests visit with the dog.

Guests and local residents have gotten wind of the partnership between Aloft and rescue groups and have started to stop by to visit, and bring local treats and other goodies for the dogs. Some guests have traveled long distances, with their current dogs in tow, to have a meet and greet with the adoptable dogs. Being able to have a chance for dogs to meet may not be possible in a shelter environment, but it is possible at the dog-friendly hotels.

The four McKibbon Aloft hotels (Asheville, North Carolina; Orlando, Florida; Greenville, South Carolina; and Tallahassee, Florida) have adopted out over 360 dogs. What started as a project that Emma thought would take three months for a dog to find a home, resulted in the first dog being adopted in three days. “We never stopped; we always want to have a dog in our hotel. Even though we’re in the business of being at hotels, we’re willing to dedicate our time to helping improve the lives of animals in need.”

Read Next: Are You Ready to Adopt a Dog? Here’s How to Find Out

The post This Hotel Is Helping Shelter Pups Find Their Forever Homes by Bryn Nowell appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

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German Shepherd Dog (GSD) Breed InformationGerman Shepherd Dog (GSD) Breed Information

The post German Shepherd Dog (GSD) Breed Information by Dogster HQ appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.

dog in other languages

A dog is a “hund” in German, Danish, and Norwegian. (Photo via Pixabay)

German Shepherd Dog (GSD) Breed Information

Quick Facts

  • Weight: 60 – 85 pounds (27.22 – 38.56 kg)
  • Height: 23 – 25 inches (58.42 – 63.50 cm)

The Look of a German Shepherd

German Shepherd Dogs (or GSD, as they’re sometimes known!) have a noble, proportioned and commanding look. A typical GSD’s body—slightly longer than tall—is sturdy but lean. He has a slightly convex forehead, long muzzle, pointed ears and almond-shaped eyes that are set (as opposed to protruding) with an amiable expression. The neck slopes down to muscular shoulders and legs. The back legs are solid and the tail bushy. Normally black and tan, sable or just black, they also come in blue and white. They come in three versions: shorthaired (sometimes called rough-coated), medium-haired and longhaired.


Traits

German Shepherd Dog Breed Characteristics:

A German Shepherd dog barking over a fence.

A German Shepherd Dog can be obedient and protective. Photography by jody/shutterstock.

  • Handsome and well-built
  • Intelligent and eager
  • Loyal
  • Hard-working
  • Strong-willed and fearless
  • Obedient and protective
  • Handy

Ideal Human Companion

Who gets along with German Shepherd Dogs? 

A German Shepherd Dog playing.

Energetic and active people get along best with German Shepherd Dogs. Photography by smikeymikey1 / Shutterstock.

  • Energetic people
  • Active families
  • Disciplinarians
  • A-Type Personalities

What They Are Like to Live With

German Shepherd Dog puppy. Photography by Grigorita Ko / Shutterstock.

German Shepherd Dogs are fierce but friendly, and have a calm confidence that may seem kind of aloof. When in need, however, a GSD is instantly ready to protect, play a game or perform a task—in some cases as a guard dog, police dog, herder or seeing eye dog. With a strong work ethic and an eager intelligence, they crave challenges.

Not to be left alone in the house too long, German Shepherd Dogs crave interaction and involvement. They are fiercely protective of their homes and families—sometimes known to “herd” children—and they get along with other pets. Standoffish and detached with strangers or those outside the family unit, they have been known to “over-guard” or bark protectively.

German Shepherd Dogs have great instincts and fertile minds. Lots of activity and exercise will make them happy, but tracking, obedience and agility games—or any task-oriented activity—will make them even happier. A bored or neglected German Shepherd Dog may resort to chewing furniture, digging up flowers and other mischief.

Things You Should Know

A mother dog and her puppies.

What are some common health issues associated with German Shepherd Dogs? Photography by Grigorita Ko / Shutterstock. 

The benefits of a GSD — loyalty, protectiveness and eagerness, to name a few — come from careful obedience training and authority. Everyone in the household must be prepared to show “authority” and earn the dog’s respect with a firm but loving touch. They do not respond to negativity or anger. Once achieved, this respect may need to be earned again and again.

German Shepherd Dogs don’t need to be bathed very often, but they tend to shed in great quantities. Brush them daily, outside if possible. Like any large dog, they can handle apartment living quite well but need daily walks and, if possible, vigorous exercise to stay sharp.

Some common health problems include hip and elbow dysplasia, skin allergies and pancreas deficiencies, They normally live up to 12 years.

German Shepherd Dog (GSD) Breed Information History

dog paws puppy paws

German Shepherd Dogs are actually a relatively new breed. Photography by otsphoto/Shutterstock.

The German Shepherd Dog is a relatively new breed, almost entirely developed in the 20th century. Attempting to create a standard herding dog for his country, German breeder Capt. Max von Stephanitz invented the Deutsche Schäferhunde in 1899 from a mix of early shepherd dogs having various coat lengths, textures, body types and colors. Stephanitz’s aim was to develop a standard sheep-herding dog with the solid intelligence and work ethic to assist farm workers and laborers as well as police and soldiers. Standardized in Germany in 1901, the German Shepherd Dog came to America in 1907 and flourished with the help of organizations like the German Shepherd Dog Club of America.

Read more about German Shepherd Dogs on Dogster.com:

The post German Shepherd Dog (GSD) Breed Information by Dogster HQ appeared first on Dogster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren’t considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Dogster.com.